Mes articles sur le jardinage (en anglais)

Modérateur: Super Moderators

Mes articles sur le jardinage (en anglais)

Messagede Didicha le 17 Oct 2008, 09:32

Premier article:

Lethal Yellowing

Lethal Yellowing disease Lethal Yellowing disease is threatening coconut palms in the Turks and Caicos Islands. The disease is not new, and there are reports of LY that date back to the 19th century in the Grand Cayman Islands. International attention was first drawn to the problem in the 1960s. By 1980, the disease had been responsible for the death of over 7 million palms in Jamaica. The Jamaican epidemic was matched by similar outbreaks in Cuba, Haiti, the Dominican Republic, the Bahamas and Florida. In 1977, the disease arrived in Mexico and began to move down the Yucatan Peninsula to Belize. LY recently reached the Turks and Caicos and in the last five years has destroyed a great deal of the coconut palm population, specificaly in the Grace Bay area and at the Provo Golf Course .
The symptoms of affected palms cause premature nut fall, yellowing foliage and necrosis of the inflorescence. Within six to nine months after these symptoms first appear, the palm is completely defoliated and dies.

LY is often thought of as the "dengue of palm trees" because it is caused by a microorganism – a phytoplasma or mycoplasma – which is similar to a bacterium but has no cell wall. LY is transmitted by an insect – the planthopper Myndus crudus.

Phytoplasmas cause systemic infections an this is assumed to cause a physical obstruction to the flow of nutrients, which eventually kills the tree.

There is no known cure for LY, and vector control is difficult. Antibiotic applications of oxytetracycline could be used to suppress symptoms, but single palm applications are expensive and not proven to be the cure.

Resistant varieties are now being identified and other resistant hybrids are being developed. Of these, the Maypan hybrid (a cross between the Malayan dwarf and a Panama Tall variety) was recently used in replanting programmes quite successfully.
Dernière édition par Didicha le 17 Oct 2008, 09:36, édité 2 fois.
L'acool ne résout pas les problèmes... Mais le lait et l'eau non plus
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Didicha
 
Messages: 22196
Inscription: 31 Déc 1969, 19:00
Localisation: Turks and Caicos Islands

Re: Mes article sur le jardinage (en anglais)

Messagede Didicha le 17 Oct 2008, 09:32

Deuxieme article:
The beautiful Bougainvillea (Paper Flower)

I've always been enchanted by bougainvilles . They flourish generously with almost continuous blooming year round and they are problably the most popular plant here in the TCI. They're truly a sight to behold, especially when their colourful bracts far outnumber their foliage! Bougainvilleas are very easy to grow which is why they are so popular.

There are many plants with bracts (either single or clustered) of varying shades such as red, orange, purple, white, mauve, yellow and pink, as well as bi-colored.

Plant type: Bougiinvilleas are tropical/Sub-tropical flowering perennial vines that are native to Brazil in South America where the plant grows in the biome of the Amazon rainforest. It can be trained as a shrub or small tree, grown on ground or potted in containers or hanging baskets. A vigorous growing evergreen woody plant with or without spines, depending on the species and cultivars.

Brief plant care: They require full sun for optimum growth and flowering though they can tolerate semi-shade. Plant in well-drained potting medium of loam and coarse sand, moist and moderately fertile soil. Needs regular water moderately.

Tips for Propagation;
From seed or stem cuttings, the latter being the most favoured method. It can be easily rooted just by cutting branches, about 6 inches of softwood but much better result if it's hardwood. The cutting is placed into a small pot filled with a good soil made of top soil, sand and peatmoss. It needs to be kept very moist and in the shade. You can also place the entire cutting in a plastic bag to keep the humidity high. It will not be long before you see new leaves coming from branches. After a couple months you can introduce the plant into your garden.

Pests ;
The most persistent and damaging pest of the bougainvillea is the caterpillar. It eats the leaves, giving the plant a tattered look.
The thorns of Bougainvillea are also are good barries against burglars. If planted under a window it could make your home more protected.

This plant is without a doubt one of our most bright and colorful of all tropical plants.The following are some varieties and their colors: Barbara Karst (red); California Gold (gold); Elizabeth Angus (large purple); Helen Johnson (dwarf red); James Walker (magenta pink); Miami Pink (pink); Ms. Alice (white); New River (medium purple); Pink Pixie (dwarf pink); Raspberry Ice (red); Rosenka (dwarf gold/pink); Silhouette (light purple); Sundown Orange (orange); Surprise (single pink); Viki (pink and white).Note: the Bougainvillea 01 is the Rosenka variety.
L'acool ne résout pas les problèmes... Mais le lait et l'eau non plus
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Didicha
 
Messages: 22196
Inscription: 31 Déc 1969, 19:00
Localisation: Turks and Caicos Islands

Re: Mes article sur le jardinage (en anglais)

Messagede Didicha le 17 Oct 2008, 09:34

Troisieme article

Natural hedge

Hedges are ideal boundary screens, providing a living barrier for privacy, security, shelter and structure in the garden. Hedges are also ideal backgrounds in the garden,as they define the bush from the private garden. Hedges can be manicured for a formal look or remain natural and therefore requiring less maintenance.
Here are some of species that are frequently found in the TCI:

Ficus: The ficus Benjaminia is the most popular hedge plants. They are in fact , trees, some growing to be quite large. Because they are very fast growing plants , they have become the most popular hedge plant. Although one would trim the ficus to shape within one's own landscape, the ficus roots would still grow as though it were a tree . So despite cutting down the trunk, the roots try to grow as though they were supporting a full sized tree. So after a few years, your soil will be totally invaded by ficus tree roots. The maintenance of the ficus requires monthly maintenance making it a high cost plant to have , but good to consider if a large plant is required within the landscape.

Silver Buttonwood (or Green Buttonwood): The Silver buttonwood differs from the Green one as it has a layer of fine hairs covering the leaves giving it a silver like coloring. Normally, Silver buttonwoods grows as a multi-trunked small tree but in ideal situations, they can grow to be 50 feet tall. If properly pruned this plant can be used as a great hedge. It is a favorite plant because it is a very adaptable and tolerant of diverse soil and water conditions. After been planted and established it could become a self sufficient watering plant.. It is even salt tolerant and so, often planted along beachfronts. It requires full sun.

Snow bush: This is a rounded tropical shrub that could reach 5 to 8 feet tall and 4 to 7 feet wide, but it still could be maintained at a much lower height than that. It has highly colored foliage with leaves that look like flowers. The plant may changes color in a bright sunny location. The colours of the leaves may change from green, to maroon, to pink and finally to pure white. The leaves turn green with age or when the plant is placed in the shade. The plant is not susceptible to any majors diseases or pests.


Carissa (Natal Plum): The dark, glossy leaves and fragrant, white, pin-wheel flowers make Carissa a deservedly popular shrub. Dwarf and tall cultivars are available. As an informal hedge, it has an added benefit: the sharp, branched spines of Carissa make it an impenetrable barrier, well-suited to applications where additional security is desired. It needs full sun and is drought-tolerant. Care should be taken when pruning this plant and removing debris, since the spines are ferocious.Bougainvillea: Bougainvillea are colorful and great for barriers because of their thorny nature. They also require maintenance for both pests and pruning.

Scavolea: This is one of the plants which is frequently found in the gardens of TCI. Scavolea is a very easy hedge to maintain. It is salt resistant, requires very little water and is virtually pest free. But unless you have a large yard and you want to define your land avoid using Scavolea. It also seems increasingly difficult to import this plant.

You may also want to consider some other plants to be used as hedges that are not as well know , such as:
Ixora, Night blooming Jasmin, Sambac Jasmin, schefflera green or varigated, Oleander.

And for low hedges: Ruellia, Dwarf Snow bush, Dwarf Ixora, Green Island Ficus
Dernière édition par Didicha le 17 Oct 2008, 10:03, édité 1 fois.
L'acool ne résout pas les problèmes... Mais le lait et l'eau non plus
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Didicha
 
Messages: 22196
Inscription: 31 Déc 1969, 19:00
Localisation: Turks and Caicos Islands

Re: Mes articles sur le jardinage (en anglais)

Messagede DGardener le 17 Oct 2008, 09:54

Chapeau my friend :hello:

Très intéressant quoi qu'un brin dépaysant :lol: J'aimerais avoir autant de succès avec les Bougainvillés, comme tu en parles :rolleyes:

Dis, pour les haies, tu ne parles pas des plumbagos, je croyais que c'était courant dans les îles :scratch:

Et pour les Ruellias, je voulais te dire que le plant mère que j'ai je l'ai mis en dormance au sous-sol, mais j'ai fait 3 boutures qui ont rapidement pris racine et qui grossissent à vu d'oeil, alors une haie de ruellias, j'aimerais bien en voir. Si jamais tu as ton kodak en passant près d'une :blush:

Je te souhaite longue vie de chroniqueur Didicha :grin:
L'avantage d'être intelligent, c'est qu'on peut toujours faire l'imbécile, alors que l'inverse est totalement impossible. - Woody Allen
Avatar de l’utilisateur
DGardener
 
Messages: 35723
Inscription: 31 Déc 1969, 19:00
Localisation: Bois-des-Filion, QC - zone 5b - Inscrit le 5 mars 2004

Re: Mes articles sur le jardinage (en anglais)

Messagede Didicha le 17 Oct 2008, 10:10

DGardener a écrit:Chapeau my friend :hello:

Très intéressant quoi qu'un brin dépaysant :lol: J'aimerais avoir autant de succès avec les Bougainvillés, comme tu en parles :rolleyes:

Dis, pour les haies, tu ne parles pas des plumbagos, je croyais que c'était courant dans les îles :scratch:

Et pour les Ruellias, je voulais te dire que le plant mère que j'ai je l'ai mis en dormance au sous-sol, mais j'ai fait 3 boutures qui ont rapidement pris racine et qui grossissent à vu d'oeil, alors une haie de ruellias, j'aimerais bien en voir. Si jamais tu as ton kodak en passant près d'une :blush:

Je te souhaite longue vie de chroniqueur Didicha :grin:


Ce qui a du succes sur un ile n'a necessairement du succes sur un autre. Quand je fais un article je pense a ce qui pousse bien ici. Le plumbago je ne l'utilise plus, a certain endroit il pousse tres bien alors qu'a d'autre un peu moins bien et quand ta plante pousse pas bien je fais alors un mauvais choix de paysagiste. Le plumbago est avant tout un grimpant, mais on peut le tenir en plante de bordure. Enfin je ne l'ai jamais vu en plus grand haie a moins d'avoir un soutient quelquonque.

Les ruellias sont des envahissantes, mais j'aime bien. C'est hyper facile et effectivement comme tu le dis c'est facile a bouturer. Pour une haie basse ou pour mettre devant les Bougainvillea (deux hauteurs différentes) c'est bien. OK je te ferais des pics :)
L'acool ne résout pas les problèmes... Mais le lait et l'eau non plus
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Didicha
 
Messages: 22196
Inscription: 31 Déc 1969, 19:00
Localisation: Turks and Caicos Islands

Re: Mes articles sur le jardinage (en anglais)

Messagede Cassis le 17 Oct 2008, 10:45

Merci d'avoir pris le temps de mettre tes articles ;)


Pour le ruellia,je me trompe ou on en trouve en blanc aussi?
Finalement j'ai rentré le mien,pas capable de le laisser agoniser dehors :lol:
Je l'ai coupé assez court et il a des tiges de 6" déjà qui ont repoussé.
Une belle découverte que je pourrai partager en boutures au printemps prochain :thumbsup:

J'aime bien le Carissa,le feuillage est pas mal à mon gout mais jamais vu ça ici.
Image
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Cassis
 
Messages: 6642
Inscription: 31 Déc 1969, 19:00
Localisation: Laval , Québec Zone5 St-Adien d'Irlande 4 A-Inscrite le 10 janv. 05

Re: Mes articles sur le jardinage (en anglais)

Messagede DGardener le 17 Oct 2008, 13:33

Merci pour ta réponse Didicha :)

Cassis, je crois me rappeler que Didi a parlé des ruellia rouge aussi :shock:

Bon OK, je sais que tu haïs les tites fleurs rouge :glare:

:lol: :lol: :lol:
L'avantage d'être intelligent, c'est qu'on peut toujours faire l'imbécile, alors que l'inverse est totalement impossible. - Woody Allen
Avatar de l’utilisateur
DGardener
 
Messages: 35723
Inscription: 31 Déc 1969, 19:00
Localisation: Bois-des-Filion, QC - zone 5b - Inscrit le 5 mars 2004

Re: Mes articles sur le jardinage (en anglais)

Messagede DGardener le 17 Oct 2008, 13:34

Didicha a écrit:Ruellia...Pour une haie basse ou pour mettre devant les Bougainvillea (deux hauteurs différentes) c'est bien.

Ça doit faire de l'effet une haie avec ces deux plantes :shock: :shock: :shock:
L'avantage d'être intelligent, c'est qu'on peut toujours faire l'imbécile, alors que l'inverse est totalement impossible. - Woody Allen
Avatar de l’utilisateur
DGardener
 
Messages: 35723
Inscription: 31 Déc 1969, 19:00
Localisation: Bois-des-Filion, QC - zone 5b - Inscrit le 5 mars 2004

Re: Mes articles sur le jardinage (en anglais)

Messagede Didicha le 17 Oct 2008, 22:17

DGardener a écrit:Merci pour ta réponse Didicha :)

Cassis, je crois me rappeler que Didi a parlé des ruellia rouge aussi :shock:

Bon OK, je sais que tu haïs les tites fleurs rouge :glare:

:lol: :lol: :lol:


Rose, blanc et mauve, ce dernier étant le plus facile :)
L'acool ne résout pas les problèmes... Mais le lait et l'eau non plus
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Didicha
 
Messages: 22196
Inscription: 31 Déc 1969, 19:00
Localisation: Turks and Caicos Islands

Re: Mes articles sur le jardinage (en anglais)

Messagede Didicha le 17 Oct 2008, 22:19

Cassis a écrit:
:thumbsup:

J'aime bien le Carissa,le feuillage est pas mal à mon gout mais jamais vu ça ici.


Le carissa donne une fruit (natal plum) plus ou moins a voir avec la prune et c'est pas mal comme gout. La fleur du Carissa sent tres bon, un peu comme le jasmin. Je ne me souviens pas d'avoir vu ca au Qc, c'est une plante solide.
L'acool ne résout pas les problèmes... Mais le lait et l'eau non plus
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Didicha
 
Messages: 22196
Inscription: 31 Déc 1969, 19:00
Localisation: Turks and Caicos Islands

Re: Mes articles sur le jardinage (en anglais)

Messagede Antille le 19 Oct 2008, 09:40

je profite déjà des conseils de Didicha, je ne savais pas qu'on pouvait propager les bougainvilliers par semis :good: merci Didicha! :thumbsup:
je pense que plus d'un vont apprécier cette banque de données que tu leur fournis :thumbsup: :hello:
bon succès et longue vie à tes chroniques! :thumbsup:
Antille.
Le sage est méthodique mais pas tranchant,
Intègre mais pas blessant,
Droit mais pas absolu,
Lumineux mais pas éblouissant
Image
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Antille
 
Messages: 9946
Inscription: 31 Déc 1969, 19:00
Localisation: Longueuil inscrite le 7 février 2003

Re: Mes articles sur le jardinage (en anglais)

Messagede Didicha le 20 Oct 2008, 12:21

Antille a écrit:bon succès et longue vie à tes chroniques! :thumbsup:
Antille.


Merci Antille :) et elle se rallonge de semaine en semaine, j'avais le 3/4 d'une page cette semaine, faut dire que c'est difficile de compter les mots, surtout que dépasser 100 je sais pas ce qui vient apres ;)

Les Bougain en semis, j'ai jamais essayé par contre, mais c'est possible. Ici couper une branche et la repiquer est beaucoup plus facile a faire.
L'acool ne résout pas les problèmes... Mais le lait et l'eau non plus
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Didicha
 
Messages: 22196
Inscription: 31 Déc 1969, 19:00
Localisation: Turks and Caicos Islands


Retourner vers Art des jardins

Qui est en ligne

Utilisateurs parcourant ce forum: Aucun utilisateur enregistré et 7 invités

cron